Plinian Core Simple Extension

http://purl.org/plic/terms/3.2.1/PlinianCore

Under Development

Plinian Core is a set of concepts that defines the necessary basic attributes to integrate and recover the information about species of organisms required by users specialized in biodiversity as well as users of other areas. This extension is supposed to be used in addition to the taxon core and the simple images, vernacular names and references extension.

Keywords: plic:Plinian Core; dwc:Taxon

Link: http://purl.org/plic/extension/3.2.1/pliniancore.xml


Properties



BaseElements

TaxonRecordID
Unique identifier of the record within the database.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/TaxonRecordID
Examples: "8fa58e08-08de-4ac1-b69c-1235340b7001", "32567", "http://species.gbif.org/abies_alba_1753", "urn:lsid:gbif.org:usages:32567"
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/TaxonRecordID
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupBaseElements
Data Type string
Requiredtrue
GlobalUniqueIdentifier
An Uniform Resource Name (URN) used as an unique identifier of the taxon record.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/GlobalUniqueIdentifier
Examples: urn:lsid:recibio.net:taxon:8fa58e08-08de-4ac1-b69c-1235340b7001
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/GlobalUniqueIdentifier
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupBaseElements
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
Abstract
General description of the taxon. This concept could point out any information about the taxon. Its main goal is summarize the most relevant or attractive characteristics of this taxon to the general public.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/Abstract
Examples: A mottled bluish-grey rorqual which is the largest living animal and reaches lengths of up to 27 m [Balaenoptera musculus].
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/Abstract
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupBaseElements
Data Type string
Requiredfalse

RecordMetadata

Language
Language used to write the species information, ISO 639-2 according to GBIF Metadata Profile, Reference Guide http://links.gbif.org/gbif_metadata_profile_guide_en_v1.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/Language
Examples: "spa", "eng",...
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/Language
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupRecordMetadata
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
AudiencesUnstructured
Users to which the information is addressed. The defined audiences are: Biodiversity researchers, teachers and students, decision makers, professionals from another areas and general public.This list audience codes has to be separated by means of comma or /.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/AudiencesUnstructured
Examples: "Teachers and students", "Decision makers"
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/AudiencesUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupRecordMetadata
Data Type string
Requiredfalse

NomenclatureAndClasification

SynonymsUnstructured
A list of scientific names used for this taxon as a text block
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/SynonymsUnstructured
Examples: Geranium acaule L., Geranium bangii Hieron., Geranium caespitosum Walp., Geranium malpasense R. Knuth
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/SynonymsUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNomenclatureAndClasification
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
DetailUnstructured
Unstructured information regarding the names of the species or taxon, whether these are scientific or not.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/DetailUnstructured
Examples: "Pronunciation", "etymology"
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/DetailUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNomenclatureAndClasification
Data Type string
Requiredfalse

TaxonomicalDescription

BriefDescription
Brief description, presented in a simple technical language, to distinguish the species from other close or similar ones.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/BriefDescription
Examples: Cap 8–20(30)cm, brown often with a whitish bloom at first gradually lost on expanding leaving a white line at the margin, smooth and dry initially becoming greasy, in wet weather slightly viscid and polished. Stem 30–230 x 30–70(110)mm, robust, pallid with white net. Flesh white, unchanging, flushed dirty straw-colour or vinaceous in cap.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/BriefDescription
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupTaxonomicalDescription
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
FullDescriptionUnstructured
Complete and detailed account of the taxonomic and systematic characters, usually comprising several sections, and not limited to the diagnostic features.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/FullDescriptionUnstructured
Examples:
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/FullDescriptionUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupTaxonomicalDescription
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
Keys
Tool for the identification of organisms, comprising a series of steps, each of which represents a question about one or more characters of the organism. Each step offers multiple alternatives, choosing one of them will lead us to the next step until reaching, finally, the name of the organism. Most of the keys only offer two alternatives, the so called dichotomous keys. A taxon can include an identification key for the subordinate taxa.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/Keys
Examples: The register of a genre will include the keys of the species shown in this genre, and the register of a species will include the keys of infra-specific ranks (in the case of plants: subspecies, variety, forms...)
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/Keys
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupTaxonomicalDescription
Data Type string
Requiredfalse

NaturalHistory

LifeFormUnstructured
General appearance. Characteristic mode of growth or occurrence associated to its environment, particularly for plants. Comprising its size, shape, texture and orientation. In block text format
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/LifeFormUnstructured
Examples: "Tree", "Shrubs", "Herbs",...
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/LifeFormUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
LifeCycleUnstructured
Life history of a living organism: The course of developmental changes in an organism from fertilized zygote to maturity or stages through which an organism passes. In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/LifeCycleUnstructured
Examples: "The fungus fruit body is the spore-producing stage of the life cycle. The spores produced by fruit bodies are usually the result of sexual reproduction. The fruit body is supported by and develops from an extensive network of thread-like filaments called hyphae. Hyphae are often collectively termed the mycelium; the food-absorbing part of the fungus. When conditions are favorable, and the mycelium is at the proper stage of development, fruit bodies are produced by the fungus. The spores produced by a fruit body are released initiate the life cycle anew."
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/LifeCycleUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
ReproductionUnstructured
All data related to the production of offspring as a block of text.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/ReproductionUnstructured
Examples: It has both sexual and asexual reproduction (fragmentation), although sexual reproduction is little known and its expansion is mainly due to the dispersion of fragments in coastal marine areas of low depth (up to 30 meters deep) where it finds the ecological conditions suitable for their settlement and proliferation
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/ReproductionUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
Event
An action in the natural history of the species that occurs at some location during some time. A controlled vocabulary is recommended.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/Event
Examples: "flowering", "migration", "courtship", "hatching "
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/Event
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
StartTimeInterval
The date-time or interval at which an event starts. Recommended best practice is to use an encoding scheme, such as ISO 8601:2004(E). A controlled vocabulary is recommended.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/StartTimeInterval
Examples: "1963-03-08T14:07-0600" is 8 Mar 1963 2:07pm in the time zone six hours earlier than UTC, "2009-02-20T08:40Z" is 20 Feb 2009 8:40am UTC, "1809-02-12" is 12 Feb 1809, "1906-06" is Jun 1906, "1971" is just that year, "2007-03-01T13:00:00Z/2008-05-11T15:30:00Z" is the interval between 1 Mar 2007 1pm UTC and 11 May 2008 3:30pm UTC, "2007-11-13/15" is the interval between 13 Nov 2007 and 15 Nov 2007.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/StartTimeInterval
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
EndTimeInterval
The date-time or interval at which an event ends. Recommended best practice is to use an encoding scheme, such as ISO 8601:2004(E).A controlled vocabulary is recommended.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/EndTimeInterval
Examples: "1963-03-08T14:07-0600" is 8 Mar 1963 2:07pm in the time zone six hours earlier than UTC, "2009-02-20T08:40Z" is 20 Feb 2009 8:40am UTC, "1809-02-12" is 12 Feb 1809, "1906-06" is Jun 1906, "1971" is just that year, "2007-03-01T13:00:00Z/2008-05-11T15:30:00Z" is the interval between 1 Mar 2007 1pm UTC and 11 May 2008 3:30pm UTC, "2007-11-13/15" is the interval between 13 Nov 2007 and 15 Nov 2007.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/EndTimeInterval
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
AnnualCycleUnstructured
Set of changes or events that recurrently take place at the same time of year and are influenced by seasonal and inter-annual climate variations. For example: reproduction, flowering, fruiting, emergence of insects, etc. Also called phenology, mainly in plants. In the case of migration, refers only to the timing of it; other data about this are gathered in MigratoryData. In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/AnnualCycleUnstructured
Examples: The butterfly hibernates over winter, The pairs only mate once after overwintering, eggs are laid in early spring, in batches of up to 400 at a time
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/AnnualCycleUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
FeedingType
Primary diet source. A controlled vocabulary is recommended.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/FeedingType
Examples: "Autotrophs", "Heterotrophs-Herbivores", "Heterotrophs-Carnivores", "Heterotrophs-Omnivores", "Heterotrophs-Saprophagous", "Heterotrophs-Detitivores",...
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/FeedingType
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
TrophicStrategy
Tactic used to obtain energy or nutrients. A controlled vocabulary is recommended.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/TrophicStrategy
Examples: "Chemosynthetic organisms", "Photosynthetic organisms", "Parasites", "Decomposers", "Suspension feeders", "Substrate feeders", "Grazers", "Fluid-feeders", "Predators",...
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/TrophicStrategy
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
TrophicStrategyRemarks
Unstructure notes about feeding strategies.
See also https://github.com/PlinianCore/Documentation/wiki/FeedingAtomizedClass#strategyremarks
Examples: an occasional scavenger
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/TrophicStrategyRemarks
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
FeedingUnstructured
Information related to supply food for the development and sustenance of the individual and-or its offspring as text block.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/FeedingUnstructured
Examples: It hunts rabbits and other mammals (including rodents and insectivores), birds (especially the red-legged partridge[citation needed]), reptiles and amphibians, most actively during twilight and at night
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/FeedingUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
DispersalType
Means or vector of dispersal. A controlled vocabulary is recommend.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/DispersalType
Examples: "Zoochory", "Anemochory", "Hydrochory", "Barochory", "Autochory"...
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/DispersalType
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
StructureDispersed
Mechanism or structure which seeds are dispersed. A controlled vocabulary is recommend.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/StructureDispersed
Examples: "Seed", "Fruit", "Vegetative structure", "Spores", "Gametes", "Eggs", "Offspring and Individuals"...
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/StructureDispersed
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
DispersalUnstructured
The permanent spreading of individuals away from each other not including return. Dispersal determines the range over which genetic mixing occurs, and thus, the degree of homogeneity and inbreeding in a population. In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/DispersalUnstructured
Examples: It is dispersed by small fragments that are dragged or carried in the anchors or nets of the boats.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/DispersalUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
BehaviorUnstructured
Responses, reactions or movements made by an organism in a particular situation. In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/BehaviorUnstructured
Examples: It is able to leap up to 50 times its size. They use a tether of silk that they produce from their bodies to do so. They are able to use the hydraulic movement of their limbs in spite of not having muscles in their body to do so. They do have to stop now and then to be able to readjust their blood pressure. They are very curious by nature too. This is why they will leap when a human places their hand out. However, they may jump backwards too so that they can get enough distance from that object. They stay focused for long periods of time on what they approach too
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/BehaviorUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
InteractionSpeciesType
String with the type of interaction. Each element is seperated by comma and each list of elements by ;. A controlled vocabulary is recommended.
See also https://github.com/PlinianCore/Documentation/wiki/InteractionAtomizedClass#interactionspeciestype
Examples: "predation"," parasitism;predation", "parasitism"
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/InteractionSpeciesType
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
InteractionUnstructured
Mutual or reciprocal actions or influences. For example, predation, parasitism, mutualism, etc. Relations with products grown and stored by man (plagues) are also included. In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/InteractionUnstructured
Examples: It is a predator of small invertebrates. Leeches appear to be a major source of adult mortality. It is predated by birds, mammals, fish, and other amphibians, however many of them are deterred by the its toxic skin secretions.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/InteractionUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
MolecularDataUnstructured
Information on the chemical structures and biological processes at the molecular level: DNA and proteins sequences, protein structures, expression profiles of genes protein domains, families of genes, mutations, polymorphisms, involvement in disease, ... Undeveloped. Placeholder for connecting with standards developed by specialists. For example, Standards for Data Exchange and Management from Scalalife (http://www.scalalife.eu/content/data.html). As free text.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/MolecularDataUnstructured
Examples: "The main toxins in Digitalis spp. are the two chemically similar cardiac glycosides: digitoxin and digoxin"
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/MolecularDataUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
MigratoryUnstructured
The regular, usually seasonal, movement of all or part of an animal population to and from a given area, which can occur in variable periods of time and even involve more than one generation. In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/MigratoryUnstructured
Examples: Birds from northern and eastern Europe are migratory and move to southern Europe or Africa. Birds from central Europe often stay in the breeding areas, especially the males [Mebs & Schmidt 2006].
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/MigratoryUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
EcologicalSignificanceUnstructured
Ecological importance of the taxon. (Placeholder). In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/EcologicalSignificanceUnstructured
Examples: They are vital within their ecosystem for the production of oxygen and organic material and they support numerous animal species that utilise them as a site for breeding, feeding and shelter.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/EcologicalSignificanceUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
EnvironmentalEnvelopeUnstructured
Set of environmental conditions within which it is believed that the species can persist; that is where its environmental requirements can be satisfied. In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/EnvironmentalEnvelopeUnstructured
Examples: The temperature range for the Mediterranean strain is 7°C - 32.5°C, while the maximum salinity is 38 ppt (NIMPIS, 2002).
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/EnvironmentalEnvelopeUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupNaturalHistory
Data Type string
Requiredfalse

Invasiveness

WhatImpact
An indication of the actual impact as a free text string.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/WhatImpact
Examples: "Destroys riparian vegetation", "Destroys irrigation systems", "Displaces Arvicola sapidus",...
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/WhatImpact
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupInvasiveness
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
Vector
By which means a species occupies a new territory.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/Vector
Examples: "fishing boats", "dirty boots", "cars (Aedes albopictus)"
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/Vector
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupInvasiveness
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
Route
This is equivalent and probably replaceable by gisin:route.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/Route
Examples: Eggs and larvae, or infested cladodes, were sent from Nevis to Montserrat and Antigua in 1962 and to Grand Cayman in 1970 (Bennett et al. 1985). By 1963 the cactus moth had invaded the Lesser Antilles to Puerto Rico (Garcia-Tuduri et al. 1971)
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/Route
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupInvasiveness
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
impactTarget
This is equivalent and probably replaceable by gisin:target
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/impactTarget
Examples: "Environment", "HumanHealth", "Economy", "Unknown"
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/impactTarget
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupInvasiveness
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
impactMechanism
Mechanism of introduction or impact to a new location. This is equivalent and probably replaceable by gisin:impactMechanism.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/impactMechanism
Examples: They clog pipes by forming colonies inside of the pipes
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/impactMechanism
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupInvasiveness
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
InvasivenessUnstructured
Information about invasive exotic species that could threaten to ecosystem, habitats and species. As a text block
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/InvasivenessUnstructured
Examples: In forests it competes with seedling trees and can slow their establishment and growth. Pampas grass creates a fire hazard with excessive build-up of dry leaves, leaf bases, and flowering stalks.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/InvasivenessUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupInvasiveness
Data Type string
Requiredfalse

HabitatAndDistribution

HabitatUnstructured
General description of the sites where the species is found (ecosystem, forest, environment or micro-habitat). (Placeholder). In block text format
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/HabitatUnstructured
Examples: This plant grows at altitudes of between 1,500 and 3,400 meters, under high levels of ultraviolet radiation, Iow atmospheric pressure and extreme temperature and humidity
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/HabitatUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupHabitatAndDistribution
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
DistributionUnstructured
Comment about the distribution of the species based on information from the collection sites of the studied specimens. A a text block.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/DistributionUnstructured
Examples: Primarily in Turkey and far E Greece, secondarily in the Crimea, Caucasus coast, Azerbaijan, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Crete and Cyprus; primarily near coasts, in areas with a strongly Mediterranean climate.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/DistributionUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupHabitatAndDistribution
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
EndemicUnstructured
Organism that lives exclusively in a particular territory and not found anywhere else. As a text block.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/EndemicUnstructured
Examples: It is a South Iberian endemic (Spain),
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/EndemicUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupHabitatAndDistribution
Data Type string
Requiredfalse

DemographyAndThreat

TerritoryUnstructured
Information associated mostly to vertebrates, referring to the territorial extension of the individual or group in terms of its activities (feeding, mating, etc.). As a text block.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/TerritoryUnstructured
Examples: The species will forage over vast distances (up to 700 km in one day has been recorded).
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/TerritoryUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupDemographyAndThreat
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
PopulationBiologyUnstructured
Study of the variations in time and space as well as size and density of populations, and the factors that cause such variations. As a text block.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/PopulationBiologyUnstructured
Examples: In Europe, the population has grown in the Alps (with the emergence of new breeding pairs due to a reintroduction project, with 19 pairs in 2010), and in the Pyrenees, particularly in its central part (Aragon, Spain), from its population of 39 pairs in 1994 to 72 pairs in 2010. In Spain, two reintroduction projects are under way in Andalusia and the Cantabrian Mountains. The total population in EU countries was estimated at 175 pairs in 2010 (J. A. Gil Gallus in litt. 2011).
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/PopulationBiologyUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupDemographyAndThreat
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
ThreatStatusUnstructured
Information about the status of the taxon.As a text block.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/ThreatStatusUnstructured
Examples: poison and electrical cables considered the biggest threats
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/ThreatStatusUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupDemographyAndThreat
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
DirectThreatUnstructured
A free text describing sources of stress and proximate pressures that are impacting or may impact the threat status of the taxon. Threats can be past (historical), ongoing, and/or likely to occur in the future.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/DirectThreatUnstructured
Examples: Deforestation.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/DirectThreatUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupDemographyAndThreat
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
LegislationUnstructured
A national proposed law or group of laws. A regional proposed law or group of laws. In block text format.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/LegislationUnstructured
Examples: Spain: Catálogo Español de Especies Exóticas Invasoras Norma: Real Decreto 630/2013, de 2 de agosto. Fecha: (BOE nº 185): 03.08.2013. Orden de 20 de marzo de 1996.
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/LegislationUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupDemographyAndThreat
Data Type string
Requiredfalse

UsesManagementAndConservation

UsesUnstructured
Ways in which species are utilized by people. Including Folklore. As a text block.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/UsesUnstructured
Examples: The Common Osier has the ability to absorb some heavy metals like cadmium, and is often planted to reclaim industrial sites
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/UsesUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupUsesManagementAndConservation
Data Type string
Requiredfalse
ManagementAndConservationUnstructured
Management: actions directed at conserving or restoring species / Conservation: interventions undertaken designed to preserve species. As a text block.
See also http://purl.org/plic/wiki/ManagementAndConservationUnstructured
Examples: The eradication work entailed physical and chemical methods, and avoided the use of heavy machinery in order to reduce damage to the environment. It consisted of hand-pulling seedlings (over 590 ha)
Qualified Namehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/ManagementAndConservationUnstructured
Namespacehttp://purl.org/plic/terms/
GroupUsesManagementAndConservation
Data Type string
Requiredfalse